August 31, 2012 |

When You’ve Got It…

When I first started out on my own, The Royal District Nursing Service were a client for their first rollout of Microsoft Software (probably Windows 3.1).  They were at Fawkner Towers, the same building as me, but up one floor.  Now 20 years later we are still being called upon to do onsite training and bespoke problem solving.  The lovely Kevin Rizzoli was in there yesterday to do a custom session for the executive on how to best work on shared documents, feedback went like this:

Kevin was great – he answered all our questions and some we didn’t even know we wanted answered!

A nice way to end the week!

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August 10, 2012 |

October is Express Training Month at City of Boroondara

We have decided to trial a number of our day courses in an express, half day format during the month of October for the City of Boroondara.  The content of express classes will cover the key information and concepts of the relevant program, but given their shorter length are  ideal for staff requiring MS Office product training, but who find it difficult to be released from duties for a full day. Attendees will be provided with the full one day course manual so they can follow up on the topics that cannot be included in the shorter version class.

Staff who prefer their training in a longer format, which allows for more content and the opportunity for more hands-on practice, will still be able to  to attend our traditional one day format classes, as these will not be taken off the schedule.

If we get enough interest in the half day express format classes after trialling them,  they will become a regular offering on the monthly IT training schedule alongside the one day classes.

 

August 31, 2011 |

Retaining Learning

When giving IT classes, I’ve always worked with the premise repetition fosters retaining the skills learned.  This is not a fashionable view, as rote or repetition learning is considered old-fashioned and behaviorist. However I can tell it works- and works beautifully –  particularly when it is done in a fun and creative way; for example by getting individuals to complete exercises, work in collaboration with the other learners to create something to model it on how they would use it in the workplace.  So,  it was interesting for me to read this blog post in The Training Zone by Gary Platt on Herman Ebgginhaus’s work , a small excerpt as below:

Ebbinghaus discovered that even with this simple task memory failed at analarming rate. His findings are often illustrated by a graph showing how memoryand recall deteriorates over a short space of time. The X axis (horizontal)measuring time and the Y axis (vertical) measuring recall.


But again these figures do not represent the research that Ebbinghausproduced, but do represent the concept he was proposing in chapter eight of hiswork, Retention as a function of repeated learning. Put simply: each revisitingof learnt material reinforces its retention.

Read Gary Platt’s full article here : http://www.trainingzone.co.uk/topic/forgetting-curve-and-its-implications-training-delivery/162373So… it is pretty obvious to me that the smartest things that trainers can do is to creatively work towards  increasing retention by allowing time in the day for the revisiting of learning and allowing people the opportunity to think and play –  and therefore remember.  Many trainers simply focus on getting through the material and therefore consider that to be a success, however if the learners cannot remember and then apply what they have learned one day, two days or two weeks after attending the training event there is hardly any point to the trainer patting him or herself on the back because they ‘delivered the content’.